Ten One No. 404 July 2016 is brought to you by New Zealand Police.

Ten One from New Zealand Police

No. 404 July 2016

Welcome to the July 2016 issue of Ten One.

In this issue, we hear the better work story of a constable who had a hand in New Zealand’s biggest meth seizure, find out about the new Child Sex Offender Register, walk a friendly hikoi with two Police staff, highlight innovative work to reduce family violence and look in on a community’s farewell to a respected and loved community officer.


You can also read Direct Line, Commissioner Mike Bush's latest blog about Police issues.

 

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New tool to protect children

The new Child Sex Offender (CSO) Register will provide Police and Corrections with up-to-date information on registered child sex offenders living in the community - a crucial component in monitoring the risk of reoffending.

  

On the road – for 75 years!

Our intrepid relayers are continuing their journeys south and north and thoughts are turning to the national parade to mark 75 years of women in policing in New Zealand.

Visible, available, responsive

They laughed when she said she wanted to join Police, but now Inspector Tracey Thompson is leading our work with Maori and other communities in Wellington District.

Family violence – stronger together

The go-live of the Integrated Safety Response (ISR) pilot in Christchurch could be a game-changer for responding to family violence in New Zealand, says Deputy Commissioner Mike Clement.

Our friends in the North

As Norway debates whether its police should carry firearms, its Police Commissioner has been in Wellington to see how we manage use of force.

PHPF - a game-changer

The Police High Performance Framework (PHPF) is bringing a change in leadership culture which will encompass all Police members – from the Executive to the newest constable or employee.

Riding the Black Wave

Five Police colleagues competed in the 2016 World Va’a (Waka Ama) Sprint Championships held on the Sunshine Coast in May – and two were crowned world champions in their divisions.


Ordinary tasks, extraordinary outcome

The record methamphetamine haul in Northland shows how everyday policing tasks can have unexpected outcomes – and as better work stories go, “I helped seize half a tonne of meth” is hard to beat.

   

A community says goodbye

Senior Constable Damian Graves was farewelled last month by the colleagues and community he loved.

Officers of the peace

Two Taranaki iwi liaison officers walked a new beat last month – the 45km Peace Hikoi from New Plymouth to Parihaka.

On the straight and narrow

Would-be mentors in a project which helps Maori remand prisoners stay on the straight and narrow had a close-up look at what the role entails.

Like grandfather, like father, like son

Inspector Sean McManus has swapped training New Zealand’s new constables for shaping the thinking of Australasia’s police leaders – but before he left he was able to witness the continuation of a family tradition.

Reach out, engage, prevent

A project which helps family violence perpetrators address their behaviour has brought a significant and sustained reduction in reoffending.

The write stuff

When it comes to action and adventure, young readers around the world are better informed thanks to Auckland Sergeant Neil White.

Action on burglary

By Commissioner Mike Bush

Kia ora. One of the key objectives of Police is for everyone to be safe and feel safe, so it’s really important that we’re in tune with and responsive to the issues that concern our communities.

Minister's Word

A view from Police Minister Judith Collins

Well done Police on the record-breaking methamphetamine haul last month.


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